№ 49. Phrygian Underground Cities in Anatolia (surviving Mars)

PAGE STATUS: Placeholder. I have never had a chance to explore this subject. As of this writing, I suspect the Philistines walked back to Greece shortly before what we know of as the Classical Period and that on the way they survived in the Phrygian underground cities. Another possibility that I am loathe to consider is that all of the Phrygian symbolism found in the United States of America for whatever reason actually has nothing to do with the Phrygians. I find this very hard to accept. Time will tell, but right now it is time I do not have. Other subjects are more pressing. No matter what the outcome, this page will remain in place because the Phrygian underground tunnels are a fascinating subject.
LAST UPDATE: September 10, 2020

 

 

 

 

Underground Cities


such as Derinkuyu, Kaymaklı, Mazi, and Özkonak. In Derinkuyu alone there were estimated to be as many as 20,000 people who survived; in Özkonak , 60,000 people. At least some of these underground cities were interconnected.

Kaymakli

There is an underground tunnel in the direction of the neighboring underground city of Derinkuyu (9 km to the south), although the tunnel has not been completely excavated.  —Ancient Code

 

 

Just who first built the underground structures and when remains something of a mystery. Archaeologists suspect the Phrygians, Persians or 15th century B.C. Anatolian Hittites may be responsible, but since the caves are carved from natural rock, it is difficult to trace their construction to a specific date.Just who first built the underground structures and when remains something of a mystery. Archaeologists suspect the Phrygians, Persians or 15th century B.C. Anatolian Hittites may be responsible, but since the caves are carved from natural rock, it is difficult to trace their construction to a specific date.  —From “Vast Underground City Found in Turkey May Be One of the World’s Largest

Include Norşun Tepe

 

List of Underground Cities in Anatolia


All of these names link to their Wikipedia entries:

 

 

 

Derinkuyu underground city

Kaymakli Underground City

Nevsehir

Özkonak Underground City

 

Mysterious flooding leads to discovery of 5,000-year-old underground city in Turkey’s Cappadocia