Phrygians

 

 

 

 

 

Underground Cities


The “progeny of Jove” (Virgil) stealthily descended down through the ages, morphing from one organizational entity to another, in order to reach the “coming time” (Virgil) in which we now live and which Virgil so longed to see. Though they only claim descent from Pythagoras and the ancient Egyptians, I believe their lineage can be traced back to the Phrygians of the Central Anatolia Region of what is now Turkey, who survived the destructions at the end of the last world en masse in over 200 “underground cities” such as Derinkuyu, Kaymaklı, Mazi, and Özkonak. In Derinkuyu alone there were estimated to be as many as 20,000 people who survived; in Özkonak , 60,000 people. At least some of these underground cities were interconnected.

Kaymakli

There is an underground tunnel in the direction of the neighboring underground city of Derinkuyu (9 km to the south), although the tunnel has not been completely excavated.  —Ancient Code

If you doubt the existence of the extensive underground tunnel systems in Colorado and throughout the Western United States (“the vault profound” which has cost U.S. taxpayers trillions of dollars), you need only read the Wikipedia article on Derinku to see what the “progeny of Jove” was capable of well over 2,500 years ago.

 

Just who first built the underground structures and when remains something of a mystery. Archaeologists suspect the Phrygians, Persians or 15th century B.C. Anatolian Hittites may be responsible, but since the caves are carved from natural rock, it is difficult to trace their construction to a specific date.Just who first built the underground structures and when remains something of a mystery. Archaeologists suspect the Phrygians, Persians or 15th century B.C. Anatolian Hittites may be responsible, but since the caves are carved from natural rock, it is difficult to trace their construction to a specific date.  —From “Vast Underground City Found in Turkey May Be One of the World’s Largest

Include Norşun Tepe

 

 

The Phrygian Cap throughout History


 

“The Liberty Cap is taken from the Phrygian cap – a conical cap or bonnet with the peak turned over in front,  associated in antiquity with the inhabitants of Phrygia, a region of central Anatolia (now Turkey).”

First White house of the Confederacy

“This We’ll Defend” (a Phrygian cap)

“The U.S. Army has, since 1778, utilized a “War Office Seal” in which the motto “This We’ll Defend” is displayed directly over a Phrygian cap on an upturned sword.” — Wikipedia

 

Mithra wears the Phrygian cap

 

Listen Carefully to Herodotus and Plato


 

Phrygian is considered by some linguists to have been closely related to Greek.[3][4]The similarity of some Phrygian words to Greek ones was observed by Plato in his Cratylus  —Wikipedia

 

 

Inscriptions

Phrygian is attested by two corpora, one dated to between about the 8th and the 4th century BC (Paleo-Phrygian), and then after a period of several centuries from between the 1st and 3rd centuries BC (Neo-Phrygian)…

The last mentions of the language date to the 5th century BC and it was likely extinct by the 7th century BC.

Paleo-Phrygian used a Phoenician-derived script (its ties with Greek are debated), while Neo-Phrygian used the Greek script.  Wikipedia

 

Cratylus 

By Plato 

Written 360 B.C.E

Translated by Benjamin Jowett

 

Her. What do you say of pur (fire) and udor (water)? 

Soc. I am at a loss how to explain pur; either the muse of Euthyphro has deserted me, or there is some very great difficulty in the word. Please, however, to note the contrivance which I adopt whenever I am in a difficulty of this sort.

Her. What is it? 

Soc. I will tell you; but I should like to know first whether you can tell me what is the meaning of the pur? 

Her. Indeed I cannot. 

Soc. Shall I tell you what I suspect to be the true explanation of this and several other words?- My belief is that they are of foreign origin. For the Hellenes, especially those who were under the dominion of the barbarians, often borrowed from them. 

Her. What is the inference? 

Soc. Why, you know that any one who seeks to demonstrate the fitness of these names according to the Hellenic language, and not according to the language from which the words are derived, is rather likely to be at fault. 

Her. Yes, certainly. 

Soc. Well then, consider whether this pur is not foreign; for the word is not easily brought into relation with the Hellenic tongue, and the Phrygians may be observed to have the same word slightly changed, just as they have udor (water) and kunes (dogs), and many other words. 

Her. That is true. 

Soc. Any violent interpretations of the words should be avoided; for something to say about them may easily be found. And thus I get rid of pur and udor…

 

 

 

Now before Psammetichus became king of Egypt,1 the Egyptians believed that they were the oldest people on earth. But ever since Psammetichus became king and wished to find out which people were the oldest, they have believed that the Phrygians were older than they, and they than everybody else. [2] Psammetichus, when he was in no way able to learn by inquiry which people had first come into being, devised a plan by which he took two newborn children of the common people and gave them to a shepherd to bring up among his flocks. He gave instructions that no one was to speak a word in their hearing; they were to stay by themselves in a lonely hut, and in due time the shepherd was to bring goats and give the children their milk and do everything else necessary. [3] Psammetichus did this, and gave these instructions, because he wanted to hear what speech would first come from the children, when they were past the age of indistinct babbling. And he had his wish; for one day, when the shepherd had done as he was told for two years, both children ran to him stretching out their hands and calling “Bekos!” as he opened the door and entered. [4] When he first heard this, he kept quiet about it; but when, coming often and paying careful attention, he kept hearing this same word, he told his master at last and brought the children into the king’s presence as required. Psammetichus then heard them himself, and asked to what language the word “Bekos” belonged; he found it to be a Phrygian word, signifying bread. [5] Reasoning from this, the Egyptians acknowledged that the Phrygians were older than they. This is the story which I heard from the priests of Hephaestus’2 temple at Memphis; the Greeks say among many foolish things that Psammetichus had the children reared by women whose tongues he had cut out.

1 In 664 B.C., probably.

2 Identified by the Greeks with the Egyptian Ptah.

 

 

 

Ovid and the Phrygia to Greece Migration of the Progeny of Jove


Long before the progeny of Jove began morphing from one entity to another in modern times (e.g. from the Freemasons to the CIA in 1947 United States of America), they migrated from one place to another, first infiltrating a people and then as time past becoming those people. Thus the progeny of Jove migrated from Phrygia where the survived the last series of planetary destruction en masse to Greece and then from Greece to Rome. This migration of the progeny of Jove from Phrygia to ancient Greece is symbolized in the story of Baucis & Philemon.  ,

Publius Ovidius Naso (Classical Latin: [ˈpu:.blɪ.ʊs ɔˈwɪ.dɪ.ʊs ˈnaː.soː]; 20 March 43 BC – AD 17/18), known as Ovid (/ˈɒvɪd/)[1] in the English-speaking world, was a Roman poet who lived during the reign of Augustus. He was a contemporary of the older Virgil and Horace, with whom he is often ranked as one of the three canonical poets of Latin literature. The Imperial scholar Quintilian considered him the last of the Latin love elegists.[2] He enjoyed enormous popularity, but, in one of the mysteries of literary history, was sent by Augustus into exile in a remote province on the Black Sea, where he remained until his death. Ovid himself attributes his exile to carmen et error, “a poem and a mistake”, but his discretion in discussing the causes has resulted in much speculation among scholars.  —Wikipedia
 Why is Wikipedia using this word?

In Ovid‘s moralizing fable which stands on the periphery of Greek mythology and Roman mythology, Baucis and Philemon were an old married couple in the region of Tyana, which Ovid places in Phrygia…  —Wikipedia

 

…certainly by the late 8th century BC [Tyana] was an independent kingdom under a ruler named Warpalawa  —Wikipedia

Among other commemorative monuments, Warpalawas most notably commissioned the carving of the İvriz relief, a rock relief at the site of Ivriz near a spring, south of Tuwanuwa in the province of Konya. In the relief, he is depicted with the storm-god Tarhunzas. His attire in the relief is seen as an evidence for his kingdom’s close affinity with the Phrygians.  —Wikipedia  [bold-red emphasis added]

 

The two trees are the oak tree (symbolizing the progeny of Jove now in control of ancient Greece) and the linden (representing the Phrygians who carved the cave in Central Anatolia)

In the hilly countryside of Phrygia there grew two trees which were cause for much amazement to anyone who saw them. You see, one was an oak tree and the other was a linden, yet the two grew from a single trunk. How did this marvel come to be, and what can we learn from the story?

 

The Oak Tree in Ancient Greece and Rome

Both the Romans and Greeks associated the oak tree with their highest gods. To the Greek god Zeus, ruler of the Olympians and the divinity of sky, rain, and thunder, the oak was sacred: he and his wife, Hera, were known as the oak god and the oak goddess.

Zeus’ oracle in Dodona, Epirus, was considered to be the oldest in Greece, though it’s importance was eventually eclipsed by the oracle of Apollo at Delphi. The oracle in Dodona was said to be founded when a black dove flew from Thebes in Egypt and settled in an oak tree at Dodona. The tree became the center of the temple, and priests would divine the god’s assertions and judgements in the rustling of the oak’s leaves.

The oracle at Dodona was visited by notable heroes of Greek mythology, including Jason, who was urged to place a protective branch from the sacred oak on the bow of his ship the Argo when he embarked on his search for the Golden Fleece. In Homer’s Odyssey, Odysseus consults the oaken oracle to ask if he should return to Ithaca in disguise or as himself.

In ancient Rome, every oak was considered sacred to Jupiter, the Italian counterpart to Zeus. Not only was Jupiter worshiped as the deity of the oak, but Roman commanders who were victorious in battle were presented with crowns of oak leaves. —The Oak Tree in Mythology – Symbolic Meaning by Carl Blackburn

 

 

MUST RESEARCH:

Philemon (Much Ado About Nothing, 2.1.35): In Greek mythology, a peasant whowith his wife, Baucislived in a humble cottage in Phrygia. Disguised as mortals, Zeus and Hermes visited them and were received with great warmth. Zeus rewarded them by transforming their cottage into a temple.

 

 

(POTENTIALLY CRITICAL) FROM https://web.stanford.edu/~meehan/donnellyr/oaks.html

[3]Plato:
Phaedrus: Socrates, you easily make up accounts (logos) from Egypt and any countries you wish! 
Socrates: Dear boy, the priests in the sacred precinct of Zeus at Dodona say that prophetic words first came from an oak tree. In fact, the men of that time on account of their guilelessness (lacking the wisdom you young people have) were content to listen to an oak tree and a rock, provided they spoke the truth. — Plato, Phaedrus 

[4] Pliny: “Here we must mention the awe felt for this plant by the Gauls. The Druids – for so their magicians are called – held nothing more sacred than the mistletoe and the tree that bears it, always supposing that tree to be the oak. But they choose groves of oaks for the sake of the tree alone, and they never perform any of their rites except in the presence of a branch of it; so that it seems probable that the priests themselves may derive their name from the Greek word for that tree.* In fact, they think that everything that grows on it has been sent from heaven and is a proof that the tree was chosen by the god himself….”—Pliny XVI, 249.  [bold-red emphasis added]

Dodona represent antiquity:

Dodona in Epirus in northwestern Greece was the oldest Hellenic oracle, possibly dating to the second millennium BCE according to Herodotus. The earliest accounts in Homer describe Dodona as an oracle of Zeus. —Wikipedia

Need to research other possible pre-Plato oak tree references. Started here:

July is the month when the Linden (Tilia cordata) is in full bloom not only in Poland or England but also throughout Central and Eastern Europe. Linden is a sacredtree. It had a special meaning in pagan, pre-Christian tradition running so deep that Christianity was forced to embrace the tree as their own.

Slavic mythology. In old Slavic mythology, the linden (lipa, as called in all Slavic languages) was considered a sacred tree. Particularly in Poland, many villages have a name “Święta Lipka” (or similar), which literally means “Holy Lime”.

Basswood (linden) has common properties with but is superior to balsa. Basswood is used for carving, which

Jacob van Oost Mercury and Jupiter in the House of Philemon and Baucis

The Mount Olympus Connection


Mount Olympus

Phrygian Mount Olympus

 

 

PHRYGIA
ΦΡΥΓΙΑ
1. A daughter of Cecrops, from whom the country of Phrygia was believed to have derived its name (Plin. H. N. v. 32).

2. Phrygia is also used for Cybele, as the goddess who was worshipped above all others in Phrygia (Virg. Aen. vii. 139; Strab. x. p. 469), and as a surname of Athena (Minerva) on account of the Palladium which was brought from Phrygia. (Ov. Met. xiii. 337; compare Apollod. iii. 12. § 3.)

 

 

Baucis & Philemon

 

 

 

Egypt, too?