The Speed of Gravity (warp drive)

 

 

In an electromagnetic universe in which the “vacuum of space” is actually filled with electrically charged plasma, gravity is nearly instantaneous over vast distances including the 8.58 light years that separate our solar system from the Sirius star system

Nothing is more critical for your understanding of what is happening to our solar system right now than the statement you just read. Nothing.

 

 

 

 

Understanding Gravity


In his paper “What’s Tugging on our Solar System? Something Bigger Than a 9th Planet Gravity Waves May Be Key!Walter Cruttenden states:

While most of the American scientists are now looking for a planet that might be around 10 earth masses (the Spanish astronomers are looking for two such objects), at a distance of 250 to 500AU, no one is considering the possibility of a million earth masses acting at a distance. The reason for the neglect is no doubt because Sirius at a distance of 8.6 light years is thought to be too far to have any noticeable effect.

Cruttenden is referring to Sirius in this quote. The mass of Earth is 5.972 × 10^24 kg.  The mass of Sirius A is 4.018 × 10^30 kg, which is roughly “a million Earth masses.” This is the crux of the matter; despite overwhelming evidence that our solar system and the Sirius star system are in a binary relationship, the distance between the two is so great that no one even considers this possibility.

 

 

 

 

Albert Einstein

Albert Einstein and Gravity


Mainstream, or consensus science, is mathematically insane. Consequently they see only what the want to see, or rather expect to see. And their god is Albert Einstein. Hence for them gravity “travels” at the speed of light.

If this guy is right, well you can forget Star Trek. At the speed of light, interstellar travel will require a “reproductive services” department aboard ship to get very far outside of our own stellar neighborhood. Is he right? In other words, is Einstein right? No. ET is here. ET has been here many times before. If it took ET more than 8.6 light years to travel from one of the closest star systems to a backwater planet such as Earth, they would not bother. The evidence of ET is also evidence of faster-than-light (i.e. “warp” drive) travel.

 

 

 

 

Tug-of-War

Gravity is Instantaneous


I have always instinctively thought we were in a binary relationship with the Sirius star system, but fought the notion for years because it seems so improbably at eight light years distance from our solar system. Then along came the Electric Universe team. These are some of the best men alive in my opinion. Through them we now understand that gravity travels infinitely faster than light. Even at eight light years the effect of gravity is nearly instantaneous. The analogy often made is that of a tug-of-war rope. Whip it and waves undulate down the rope. This is the speed of light. But pull on it and it is instantly felt at the other end. In reality, gravity is instantaneous over vast distances.

 

 

 

 

Wallace Thornhill

Gravity in an Electric Universe


If you want to understand how it is possible for our solar system to be in a binary relationship with the Sirius star system, you must understand gravity. Start by watching these three Electric Universe videos in the order presented here.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Thomas Van Flandern

Dr. Thomas Van Flandern


Here is another viewpoint from outside the school of the Electric Universe team.

Thomas C Van Flandern (June 26, 1940 – January 9, 2009) was an American astronomer and author specializing in celestial mechanics. Van Flandern had a career as a professional scientist, but was noted as an outspoken proponent of non-mainstream views related to astronomy, physics, and extra-terrestrial life. He also published the non-mainstream Meta Research Bulletin.   —Wikipedia

 

 

 

Wayne Burn

Gravity as Fluid Dynamics


What does real scientific thinking look like? Given the bestial nature of academia and mainstream (“consensus”) science, it is humble. This Saturn Hypothesis YouTube by Wayne Burn never ceases to fascinate me. At the end of the video is a web address for the Society for Interdisciplinary Studies.