544 BC


544 BC was exactly 216 orbits of Jupiter ago. If in fact galactic superwaves are recurring precisely every 216 orbits of Jupiter (Plato’s number), there should be some historical evidence for this.


Many Buddhist traditions believe it was the year when the Buddha reached parinirvana, though the actual year 0 of the Buddhist calendar corresponds to the previous year, 545 BC.   — Wikipedia

After the demise of Lord Buddha in 544 B.C., Six Great Buddhist Councils were convened to preserve the purity of the Tipitaka texts which embody the teaching of Lord Buddha. Sangayana means the congregation of learned monks who collectively revised and purified the Tipitaka texts. The First, Second and Third Great Buddhist Councils were convened in India between 544 B.C. and 308 B.C., and the Tipitaka texts were purified and revised orally.


Haryanaka Dynasty: 544 BC -412 BC

544 BC: Sun Tzu the author of the Art of War is born.

500 BC: Cast iron is invented in China around this time. The iron plough was likely invented shortly after.

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More generally, one would expect great wisdom to arise from this era.

Confucius (September 28, 551 BC – 479 BC)


Hundred Schools of Thought

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Hundred Schools of Thought (Chinese: 諸子百家; pinyin: zhūzǐ bǎijiā) were philosophies and schools that flourished from the 6th century to 221 BC, during the Spring and Autumn period and the Warring States period of ancient China.[1]

An era of great cultural and intellectual expansion in China,[2] it was fraught with chaos and bloody battles, but it was also known as the Golden Age of Chinese philosophy because a broad range of thoughts and ideas were developed and discussed freely. This phenomenon has been called the Contention of a Hundred Schools of Thought (百家爭鳴/百家争鸣; bǎijiā zhēngmíng; pai-chia cheng-ming; “hundred schools contend”). The thoughts and ideas discussed and refined during this period have profoundly influenced lifestyles and social consciousness up to the present day in East Asian countries and the East Asian diaspora around the world. The intellectual society of this era was characterized by itinerant scholars, who were often employed by various state rulers as advisers on the methods of government, war, and diplomacy.



From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Kapitolinischer Pythagoras adjusted.jpg

Bust of Pythagoras of Samos in
the Capitoline Museums, Rome.
Born c. 570 BC
Died c. 495 BC (aged around 75)

Pythagoras of Samos (US: /pɪˈθæɡərəs/;[1] UK: /pˈθæɡərəs/;[2] Greek: Πυθαγόρας ὁ Σάμιος Pythagóras ho Sámios “Pythagoras the Samian“, or simply Πυθαγόρας; Πυθαγόρης in Ionian Greek; c. 570–495 BC)[3][4] was an Ionian Greek philosopher, mathematician, and putative founder of the Pythagoreanism movement. He is often revered as a great mathematician and scientist and is best known for the Pythagorean theorem which bears his name.



Cyrus the Great

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Cyrus the Great
Illustrerad Verldshistoria band I Ill 058.jpg

Cyrus the Great with a Hemhem crown
King of Persia
Reign 559–530 BC
Predecessor Cambyses I
Successor Cambyses II
King of Media
Reign 549–530 BC
Predecessor Astyages
Successor Cambyses II
King of Lydia
Reign 547–530 BC
Predecessor Croesus
Successor Cambyses II
King of Babylon
Reign 539–530 BC
Predecessor Belshazzar
Successor Cambyses II
King of the Four Corners of the World
Reign 550-530 BC
Predecessor New office
Successor Cambyses II[citation needed]
Born 598-600 BC[2]
Anshan, Persia
Died 4 December, 530 BC[3]
Along the Syr Darya
Burial Pasargadae
House Achaemenid
Father Cambyses I
Mother Mandane of Media

Cyrus II of Persia (Old Persian: 𐎤𐎢𐎽𐎢𐏁 Kūruš;[5] New Persian: کوروش Kuruš; Hebrew: כֹּרֶשׁ Koresh; c. 600 – 530 BC),[6] commonly known as Cyrus the Great[7] and also called Cyrus the Elder by the Greeks, was the founder of the Achaemenid Empire.[8] Under his rule, the empire embraced all the previous civilized states of the ancient Near East,[8] expanded vastly and eventually conquered most of Southwest Asia and much of Central Asia and the Caucasus. From the Mediterranean Sea and Hellespont in the west to the Indus River in the east, Cyrus the Great created the largest empire the world had yet seen.[9] Under his successors, the empire eventually stretched at its maximum extent from parts of the Balkans (BulgariaPaeonia and ThraceMacedonia) and Eastern Europe proper in the west, to the Indus Valley in the east. His regal titles in full were The Great King, King of Persia, King of Anshan, King of Media, King of Babylon, King of Sumer and Akkad, and King of the Four Corners of the World.